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Lil Yachty’s Fallout with Newly Released Album: “Nuthin’ 2 Prove”

Lil Yachty’s Fallout with Newly Released Album: “Nuthin’ 2 Prove”

By Monsetrrat Castillo

Miles Parks McCollum, better known as Lil Yachty, released his latest album “Nuthin’ 2 Prove” on Oct. 19, 2018. This is his second album in the the last seven months, and it has left fans disappointed. After the letdown of his two previous albums, “Summer Songs 2” and “Teenage Emotions,” I hoped to see Yachty maintain the success of  “Lil Boat 2.” Unfortunately, as a young 21-year old rapper, Lil Yachty could not keep up the momentum. His latest 15-song album has shown that Lil Yachty truly has “Nuthin’ 2 prove.”

“Nuthin’ 2 Prove” features famous rappers like Juice WRLD, Lil Baby, Cardi B and Offset. While the choice of features pleasantly surprised me, the actual performances lacked effort. Offset sang the chorus along with Lil Yachty in “Mickey,” but was reduced to background vocals instead of a traditional feature verse. Artists like Lil Baby and Juice WRLD did not highlight their talents enough, singing and rapping in a monotone voice. I found myself waiting for some type of change, skipping through songs just to find great beats. Lil Yacthy ultimately killed each beat, and not in a good way.  

These are just a couple of many problems this album has encountered. The songs sound like there is no effort put into them, but the lyrics are far worse. Lil Yachty focuses on a new concept every song and somehow manages to fail every one. He clearly thinks too highly of himself. Speaking about how rich he is and his habit of drug usage, I found no purpose to this album.

The album’s opener  “Gimme My Respect” speaks for itself. The lyrics describe the pressure Yachty has felt from his fan base. He compares himself to other artists and considers himself a “typical” rapper. Lil Yachty says “Caught me a vibe, yeah a negative energy / Don't be upset that I called you a mini-me,” then calls rapper Lil Uzi Vert a “minigun,” ultimately undermining him. Although they do not have problems personally, they are often compared by fans and publications, and the debate has brought up some tension between them.

The fourth song on album, “I’m the Mac,” consists of purely head-scratching lyrics: “Doin' donuts like a stuntman / Somebody slide me some oil, no tin man.” The hook consists of Yachty repeating  “I’m the mack, I’m the mack, huh.” The repetition makes the song boring, and I only got through half of the two-minute song before I skipped it.

Despite plenty of misses on the album, Yachty did produce a few songs with heartfelt meanings. “Worth It” and “Forever World” showcase Yachty’s softer and more vulnerable side. In “Worth it,” Lil Yachty raps about how his significant other does not believe she is good enough, and Yachty tells her “I love you for who you are / God don't mess up at all / Even when he make us with flaws.” “Forever World” is very similar in its content. The mention of romance made Lil Yachty’s drug-filled, money-filled album less discouraging to listen to. The album’s closer “Stoney,” highlights Yachty's drug use and fame. Disregarding his lyrics in the previous song about caring for his significant other, he raps about sex, drugs and money.


By far, Lil Yachty’s “Nuthin’ 2 Prove” is the messiest album I have heard all year. After watching a few songs from “Lil Boat 2” become popular, I did not think Lil Yachty would have another fallout. Perhaps it is the level of fame at his young age that has created these flukes in his album.  I hope to see a better, more organized album from him in the future, but I will not be revisiting “Nuthin 2 Prove.”

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